Patches of trillium are becoming a more common sight

Patches of trillium are becoming a more common sight

More and more abundantly so, the trillium is showing up in the mountains of western North Carolina. The spring wildflower is very fragile, and in many areas of the country, it is illegal to pick or damage the trillium in any way. The trillium blossoms are mostly white, while as they age, begin to turn a slight purple color, as seen below.

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Older trillium begin to shade purple

As you walk along paths, hiking trails, or even in some areas that are right along side the road, you will see them in patches as their three leaved blossoms shine like a beacon, alerting those who pass by of their presence. Of the most rare trillium, the red trillium is less commonly seen than the white trillium in our area.

A single red trillium in a sea of white trillium was hard to find

A single red trillium in a sea of white trillium was hard to find

Trillium bloom in the spring from mid April through mid May, and although you may think they are young, the trillium are usually about 15 years old when they bloom and they can live up to thirty years. So please, while you’re out hiking the trails and woodland areas, or if you pass by some on the side of the road, look, photograph, teach about the trillium flowers, but please do not pick them. Help us protect our natural habitat for generations to come.

For information about hiking, scenic drives, shopping, dining and more, please visit our main website at www.franklin-chamber.com , or give us a call at (828) 524-3161. We’d love to hear from you!